Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Rejection Letters.




What to with a rejection letter? Toss it? Frame it? File it? I say file it. I hear of struggling writers using them as wallpaper, but that would be a lot of letters.

 There are two things a writer must do to receive a rejection letter. First, you must submit, and second, you must include a SASE. I always make sure I use one large enough and with enough postage for my manuscript to be returned. This way I can file the actual MS with the letter, and know which version I submitted.

I started a notebook with page protectors to file all correspondence from every submission. It is nice to go through it every once in a while just to remind myself that I am actually producing and submitting.

Yes, I reject rejection so I always tweak each returned MS and find another place to submit.

Until next time, keep writing.

8 comments:

  1. That's a good idea to keep track of which version went where!

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    1. Thanks, Katie. It helps me, I try to do a "save as" with the magazines name after it too.

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  2. I used to save the good ones—the handwritten ones and the ones that provide detailed feedback. Now, I just move on.

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    1. Happy Birthday, Kelly, again. Thanks for taking time to comment. At this stage, I hang on to all the positive and encouraging things I can. I don't hang messages on my mirror and things like that, however I did notice my wife bought some eggs that encourage me. They each have "EB" on their white surface so when I cook breakfast I am reminded of E.B. White and the Elements of Style, and the bacon too. I mean The pig from Charlott's Web.

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  3. You're right, rejections are hard but at least it's proof to yourself that you are submitting!

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    1. Thanks, Allyn. I look at each one as I am getting one step closer.

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  4. Rejections are tough, but at least they tell you that you're submitting. That's the main thing. :) Happy 12/12/12!

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  5. Thanks, Katrina. I guess the only way to avoid them is to stop writing. I kinda like them.

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